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Bee gardens going from niche to necessary

It may take more than good seed, good soil, a warming sun and a few timely rains to make your garden productive this year. It also may take some beneficial insects. Some pollinators.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2006/02/10/gar_54722.shtml
Gardening
Scientists learn the latest wireless applications for farm management

...reliability, robustness, ease of use and range." James McKinion, an electronics engineer with the USDA's Agricultural Research Service in Starkville, Miss., said wireless networking is being used on a 1,600-acre farm near Macon...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2004/06/21/liv_419660.shtml
Life & style
USDA setting up gene research center at Cornell

...Genomics, is expected to open this spring, said Judy St. John, an associate deputy administrator with the USDA's Agricultural Research Service. "The USDA-funded center will aid researchers around the country and the world in the quest to discover...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1999/01/20/tec_250795.shtml
XXX Technology
Researchers discover tea's health benefits

WASHINGTON -- For those who enjoy sipping a soothing cup of tea, there is good news: growing evidence that this ancient beverage may offer some health benefits, according to findings presented at a conference here last month. "Tea looks to be a healthy beverage," said Jeffrey Blumberg, chief of the antioxidants research laboratory at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. "It contains plant polyphenols that are similar, and in some cases identical, to fruits and vegetables that we know are health-promoting."

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1998/10/21/ent_242450.shtml
Things to Do
Patent for sterile seeds sows controversy

...a whole lot of money in developing new varieties," said Sandy Miller Hays, information director for USDA's Agricultural Research Service. "Everybody runs out and buys the seeds, collects them at the end of the year and says thank you very...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1998/05/24/tec_229483.shtml
XXX Technology
Summer brings blueberry recipes

Recalling the New England summers of her childhood, food and travel writer Linda Dannenberg says, she thinks of blueberries.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2005/07/13/foo_458487.shtml
Food
Small portions

Improving foods Tired of eating the same old food? Stick around. It's sure to change. Food scientists and marketers seem to be especially busy lately developing better, healthier and sometimes stranger things to eat. Here's a sampling:

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/09/12/ent_319024.shtml
Things to Do
Biotech corn's affect being studied

WASHINGTON -- Scientists concerned that pollen from gene-altered corn may be killing monarch butterflies wanted to know how much of the insect's favorite food, milkweed, grows on farms. They found more of the weed than they expected. Half of Iowa's corn and soybean fields, and three-quarters of the roadside and pasture land in the state contain milkweed, the Agriculture Department said Thursday. Research by the University of Minnesota turned up similar findings in that state.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2000/12/01/tec_299195.shtml
XXX Technology
Researchers discover tea's health benefits

WASHINGTON -- For those who enjoy sipping a soothing cup of tea, there is good news: growing evidence that this ancient beverage may offer some health benefits, according to findings presented at a conference here last month. "Tea looks to be a healthy beverage," said Jeffrey Blumberg, chief of the antioxidants research laboratory at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston. "It contains plant polyphenols that are similar, and in some cases identical, to fruits and vegetables that we know are health-promoting."

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1998/10/20/ent_242368.shtml
Things to Do
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