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Housing shortage hinders jobs

...unaware of existing programs for low-income and first-time home buyers. Max Lockwood, the president of the U.S. 441 Council, an economic development group that promotes the primarily rural highway corridor, said the housing shortfall has...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/10/17/met_327035.shtml
Metro
Success depends on road

DOUGLAS, Ga. - When Mayor Max Lockwood sat down with officials from Wal-Mart in the mid-1980s to sell them on the advantages of building a massive warehouse-distribution center in his small south Georgia city, he didn't talk about its lack of a four-lane highway. What he did was draw a map showing that Douglas lies near the middle of a box formed by Interstates 75, 16 and 95 in Georgia, and Interstate 10 in north Florida. Traveling in any direction, trucks could hit a major four-lane highway in fewer than 100 miles, giving them easy access to far-flung markets.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/05/21/met_314176.shtml
Metro
Authority expected to speed road projects

ATLANTA -- Last August, the Georgia Department of Transportation reported that two of its priority highway-widening projects -- the Fall Line Freeway and the Savannah River Parkway -- were 48 percent and 40 percent finished or under construction, respectively. By last week, eight months later, those numbers had crept up to nearly 55 percent for the Fall Line Freeway, which connects Augusta, Macon and Columbus, and almost 48 percent for the Savannah River Parkway linking Augusta and Savannah.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1999/04/11/met_258750.shtml
Metro
Session leaves divvied favors

...the so-called Governor's Road Improvement Program from 18 years to seven. Max Lockwood, the president of the U.S. 441 Council, an economic development agency based in Douglas that promotes the longest highway corridor in the GRIP, is a fan...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/03/26/met_309773.shtml
Metro
Study cites lost roads funding

ATLANTA -- More than $1 billion in state and local taxes generated each year by transportation-related activities are not being plowed back into Georgia's crucial transportation needs, the University of Georgia reported Monday.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2000/03/28/met_286014.shtml
Metro
Coleman touted as strong advocate for 'other' Georgia

ATLANTA -- Gov. Roy Barnes' recommendation of former state Sen. Tom Coleman of Savannah to become the next transportation commissioner will give the ``other'' Georgia a powerful ally in steering highway dollars outside the metro Atlanta area, political and business leaders said Wednesday.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1999/09/23/met_270924.shtml
Metro
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