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U.S. Muslim contracts of marriage are modernized

...air of reality and rationality to a process that is often fraught with emotion," said Aminah McCloud, a professor of Islamic Studies at DePaul University in Chicago. Dr. McCloud's marriage contract says that her husband must accompany her...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2006/08/26/rel_93997.shtml
Your Faith
Muslim professor prints Quran in modern English

...Quran and were tested annually to make sure they maintained the knowledge. The veteran University of London professor of Islamic studies said he obeys a promise to his father to read the Quran daily, and the childhood training means he doesn't...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2004/08/14/rel_425303.shtml
Your Faith
Islam's sacred script survives centuries

LOS ANGELES -- Before Mohamed Zakariya copies the words of the Koran, he washes his face, hands and feet as if he were going to pray. The pen he writes with is made from a reed that was buried in manure for four years to achieve the correct red color. His ink is soot ground to powder, a process he describes as shoulder-busting labor. The paper is dyed with tea, coated with egg whites, which makes it easier to correct mistakes, then set aside to age for at least a year. Muslim calligraphers have worked this way since the seventh century.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1999/03/27/ent_257455.shtml
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Faith notes

...Christian-Muslim talkSt. Ignatius of Antioch Melkite Catholic Church invited Waleed El-Ansary, an assistant professor of Islamic studies at the University of South Carolina, for An Afternoon of Christian-Muslim Dialogue, from 1 to 3 p.m...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/life/your-faith/2010-04-30/faith-notes
Your Faith
Faith Briefs

...dialogueSt. Ignatius of Antioch Melkite Catholic Church in Augusta invited Waleed El-Ansary, an assistant professor of Islamic studies at the University of South Carolina, for An Afternoon of Christian-Muslim Dialogue.The dialogue will be...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/life/your-faith/2010-04-23/faith-briefs
Your Faith
Islam's sacred script survives centuries

LOS ANGELES -- Before Mohamed Zakariya copies the words of the Koran, he washes his face, hands and feet as if he were going to pray. The pen he writes with is made from a reed that was buried in manure for four years to achieve the correct red color. His ink is soot ground to powder, a process he describes as shoulder-busting labor. The paper is dyed with tea, coated with egg whites, which makes it easier to correct mistakes, then set aside to age for at least a year. Muslim calligraphers have worked this way since the seventh century.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1999/03/27/ent_257376.shtml
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