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Feds increase pressure on spammers

...permanent list. On the Net: www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/alerts/spamalrt.htm www.the-dma.org (Contact Lance Gay at gayl@shns.com or visit SHNS on the Web at http://www.shns.com.)

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2002/11/18/tec_359275.shtml
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Big Brother really is watching

Smile, because your ATM soon will recognize your face, and know you. Run a red light, and a camera takes a picture of your car tags and a computer sends a ticket in the mail. Go to the bathroom at one Lake Michigan resort, and cameras record what you do. Buy a bottle of milk with a shopping card, and not only is the transaction filmed, but the time of the purchase recorded for posterity. Say hello to Big Brother.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/02/04/tec_305000.shtml
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The debate over ID cards intensifies

The most valuable card you carry in your wallet one day may not be that gold credit card, the ATM card or your health insurance identification - but your driver's license.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2002/03/24/tec_340732.shtml
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Face-recognition machines coming to airports

WASHINGTON - Face-recognition technology, now being lined up for use in airports, might be capable of finding Osama bin Laden if he showed up at a U.S. airport to catch a flight. But critics say there's no high-tech quick fix that can ferret out the ordinary terrorist from the ranks of millions of Americans on the move - and error rates on the machines are so great it's just as likely to be the innocent traveler who trips off the alarm.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2002/01/13/tec_332818.shtml
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Pushing the delete button on spam

You've got mail - and if complaints about the blight of commercial e-mails and spam that has come with the Internet are a sign, you're pretty sick about it, too. Jason Catlett, president of the Internet privacy group Junkbusters, says e-mail spam - the Net's term for unwanted and unsolicited e-mail - now accounts for more than 10 percent of the e-mail sent.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/05/05/tec_311091.shtml
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Sales of bottled water bubble ever upward

It's colorless, odorless and so practically tasteless that one company boasts it offers "nothing." The alternative is available free practically everywhere. But bottled water has become the boom marketing success of the last decade, with consumers eagerly shelling out more per gallon for designer bottles filled with water than they are spending for a gallon of gasoline.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/09/11/bus_318496.shtml
Business
High-tech still thrives in many states

While a lot of Internet dot-coms are dot-gones, the high-tech industry says that the new economy continued to grow and add jobs last year, but at the slowest rate in five years. The survey conducted by AeA, formerly the American Electronics Association, and the NASDAQ stock exchange, said high-tech companies added almost 240,000 jobs last year, and now account for about 5 percent of U.S. employment. The industry says online retail is suffering but high-tech manufacturing and export is still booming.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/06/10/tec_312329.shtml
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Link found between livestock, drug-resistant 'superbugs'

Scientists using DNA fingerprinting have proven that drug-resistant "superbugs" are escaping from hog farms into nearby water supplies and becoming part of bacteria that normally operate in the food chain. Researchers say the findings prove that drug-resistant microbes developed in U.S. farm animals can spread in the environment - and potentially to humans, where they cause resistance to drugs.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/06/08/tec_311890.shtml
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Pasteurized milk not completely free of microorganism

The milk industry has spent millions of dollars creating the image of a healthy, wholesome beverage for young and old. But how safe really is that pasteurized glass of milk? Preliminary results from an 18-month-long British study has raised troubling new questions by discovering that at least one hardy pathogen survived the pasteurization processes, and was cultured from 2.1 percent of off-the-shelf milk tested.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/06/01/tec_310525.shtml
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6 million a day download music from Net

The number of surfers downloading music from the Internet has doubled to 6 million a day in the last year - and it's not just kids leeching pop music over free sites like Napster. Surveys by the Pew Internet and American Life Project show the number of American adults looking for music files online increased in all age brackets over the last year, with almost a quarter of those aged 30 to 49 with Internet access reporting they have downloaded music files. It's largely a male hobby, the surveys show.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/04/29/tec_316167.shtml
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