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Teens' e-cigarette use linked with later smoking

CHICAGO - Teens who use e-cigarettes are more likely than others to later smoke conventional cigarettes and other tobacco products, a study at 10 Los Angeles high schools suggests.
Not all appendicitis cases need surgery

A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that some patients with appendicitis may not need surgery.
Affordable Care Act led to improved health care, study finds

Not only did the Affordable Care Act allow millions to gain insurance coverage, but it actually resulted in better access to care and in fewer people reporting poor health, a new study found.
Feeling young might bring longer life, new study suggests

A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine suggests that feeling younger than our age may help us live longer.
Device could help patients with atrial fibrillation

As we get older, the electrical system in our heart can start to malfunction. One of the most common abnormal heart conditions is atrial fibrillation, which affects about 33 million people worldwide with 5 million new cases every year.
After lobbying push, drugmaker resubmits women's sex pill

Drugmaker enlists support from lawmakers, women's groups to boost bid for female sex pill.
Georgia Regents University research reinforces benefits of exercise

Reducing fat through exercise in obese, diabetic mice improved their memory and brain function. The research comes as a new report found that obseity levels are virtually unchanged from eight years ago.
New stroke program improves treatment

A stroke is one of the most debilitating medical conditions. It can limit one's ability to eat, talk, or walk and dramatically reduce quality of life. A recent paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association introduces a new national program to streamline the treatment of stroke. Of note, only one Augusta-area hospital is part of this program.
Who pays your doc? Coming soon to a site near you

Nearly 95 percent of U.S. physicians accept gifts, meals, payments, travel and other services from companies that make the drugs and medical products they prescribe, according to the "New England Journal of Medicine."
HIV diagnosis rate fell by third in US over decade

NEW YORK - The rate of HIV infections diagnosed in the United States each year fell by one-third over the past decade. Experts celebrated it as hopeful news that the AIDS epidemic might be slowing in the U.S.