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Emergency care system is ailing, physicians say

...safety net for health care that is frayed," said Dr. Stephen Epstein, an emergency care physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Epstein was a member of the American College of Emergency Physicians task force that studied the...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2006/01/11/liv_41992.shtml
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Lesion lessons One in six Americans has something in common with President Bush: actinic keratoses - or AKs - skin lesions that can be a prelude to skin cancer. But the president did something about them. He had two rough, red, scaly patches removed from his face. Actinic keratoses may develop into squamous-cell carcinoma, the second-leading cause of skin-cancer deaths in the United States.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2002/01/17/ent_333366.shtml
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MRI used to test for coronary artery disease

A new type of imaging technique using an MRI device can detect most diseased coronary arteries, and so could spare many heart patients a more invasive, expensive and uncomfortable test, researchers say. MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging, has been used for the past 10 years to study very large blood vessels such as the aorta. Patients must lie inside the MRI machine, a giant electromagnet that yields 3-D images of the body.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2002/01/01/tec_330748.shtml
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The war on AIDS at 20

At first, it just seemed like a strange cluster of pneumonia cases among previously healthy gay men in their late 20s and 30s. Yet the editors of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention presciently noted in the June 1981 report that the pattern of illness among five men in Los Angeles "suggests the possibility of a cellular-immune dysfunction related to a common exposure that predisposes individuals to opportunistic infections."

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2001/06/04/tec_311074.shtml
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Study: Viagra unlikely to trigger heart attacks or death

ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Reassuring new data released Tuesday suggest that heart problems triggered by Viagra are extremely rare.\r

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2000/03/17/tec_284696.shtml
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Lab tests show new drug therapy may counter transplant rejection

...combined, the result was "incredibly potent immunosuppression," explained Dr. Terry B. Strom of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. It still did not allow the body to build tolerance for the transplant. "When this combination of...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1999/11/02/tec_272321.shtml
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A breath of fresh air

Breathing. You figured you already had this down pat. But it turns out that thousands of Americans are attending classes and buying books to relearn this basic bodily function.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1999/09/14/liv_270195.shtml
Life & style
Few cancer patients in studies

ATLANTA -- Less than 5 percent of U.S. cancer patients take part in experiments to test new treatments, a figure at least four times lower than ideal to answer quickly the most pressing cancer questions, according to a survey released Saturday. "We need clinical trials to know what works and what doesn't," said Dr. Allen Lichter, president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1999/05/16/tec_261565.shtml
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Scientists defend cancer approach

BOSTON -- Researchers came to the defense Friday of a Boston scientist whose much-publicized strategy of wiping out cancer tumors by cutting off their blood supply is facing increasing skepticism. The researchers said that they can make the approach work, even if others cannot. The strategy, developed by Dr. Judah Folkman of Children's Hospital in Boston, involves natural proteins that destroy cancer by choking off its blood supply.

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1998/11/14/tec_244713.shtml
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Study: Stress of firing someone doubles the risk of a heart attack

...working under a high-pressure deadline and having to fire someone," said Dr. Murray A. Mittleman of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Most people probably already suspect that bad things at work might be hard on the heart. But there...

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/1998/03/20/bus_224461.shtml
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